CSIS Charity Fund makes biggest ever grant awards

A record-breaking £1.152 million has been awarded so far this year by the CSIS Charity Fund to charities supporting people in the civil and public services in need, hardship, and distress, with provision for even more grants to be awarded later in the year. This has been made possible by a record £1.25 million donation from the charity’s main source of funding – the Civil Service Insurance Society.

It coincides with the unveiling of a new logo for the Charity Fund, aimed at reflecting the close relationship between the charity and the Insurance Society. The new logo echoes that of CSIS, acting as an important reminder of the direct link between the success of the insurance business and the impact the charity’s grant-giving can have on the lives of individuals, some of whom are in desperate need through no fault of their own.

This year’s grant awards will help bring about an increasingly wide range of assistance provided by the 31 organisations the charity has supported, including counseling services, befriending to reduce loneliness, responding to increased demand for financial support especially from first-time applicants, volunteer support, action against domestic abuse and much more.
Some of the largest grants – totaling nearly £500k – will go to the main benevolent funds giving financial and other support to current and former civil and public servants, including:

  • The Charity For Civil Servants – £250k
  • BT Benevolent Fund – £75k
  • Rowland Hill Fund – £65k
  • Post Office Orphans Institution £40k
  • Civil Service Retirement Fellowship -£35k

In addition, just over £500k has been allocated to a wide range of smaller charities that often struggle to get funding from other sources and which also support serving, former or retired public servants who have fallen on hard times. These range from The Railway Benefit Fund (£40k for financial support advice and development of information resources), Northern Ireland Prison Officers’ Central Benevolent Fund (£35k to expand a home visits programme and events for widows), The Ambulance Service Charity (£40k to support growing demand for their services) and the Social Workers Benevolent Trust (£20k to help uplift their grants programme) and not forgetting FAB!

In keeping with the roots of the charity, which date back well over 100 years, spouses of deceased CSIS policyholders who face particular hardship will receive more than £21k through regular grants to augment poor pension provision, assistance with energy bills, and other help as appropriate.

The charity is independent of the insurance business, a not for profit insurance intermediary that markets products exclusively to current and former civil and public servants. However, the Insurance Society is bound by a deed of covenant to transfer virtually all its annual trading surplus to the Charity Fund, providing the money for its annual grant giving.

Gill Noble, who chairs the Charity Fund said: “We were thrilled to be told about the size of the donation we could expect from CSIS this year which resulted from a one-off profit share from past trading. We decided to share the windfall with the charities we support. We know the extra money we have been able to provide will make a real difference to the individuals they help, many of whom work in the very services from which CSIS’s business is generated. It is a great example of successful “recycling” – a real “win, win”.

We have also been pleased to adopt a new logo which emphasises and celebrates the links between the two organisations. The previous logo was chosen when we had just established the charity as a fully independent charitable company with its own clear, strong governance structure. At the time, it was important to underline that independence. We now feel it is right to have a logo which makes it clear that we are “sister” organisations – part of a family – which we hope will bring greater awareness of the special connection between the success of the insurance business and all the good work the charity can do.”